Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Nicotine Withdrawal: On my 7th Day Without Cigarette

When someone gives up smoking, it is normal to experience nicotine withdrawal as their body learns to adjust to living without the constant influx of nicotine into their system. Smoking fosters a situation of nicotine dependence that usually occurs over a number of years. Nicotine withdrawal symptoms can include headaches, irritability, nicotine cravings, anxiety, fatigue, depression, and weight gain. If you experience these symptoms after you stop smoking, it can be helpful to understand that you are not alone. 
Nearly everyone, including me, experiences at least some of these symptoms and you should try to remember that, unpleasant as they may be, for most people they are only temporary. 
Smoking creates a chemical dependency in the smoker for nicotine. Nicotine can either act as a stimulant or a sedative, depending on the amount taken. The smoker's body finds an acceptable amount of nicotine in order to experience the pleasurable sensations associated with smoking. The first cigarette of the day is particularly effective at stimulating the dopamine-sensitive neurons in the brain, which is why smokers often find the first cigarette of the day the most satisfying. During the rest of the day, the nerve cells become desensitised to the effects of nicotine, which is a microcosm of the long-term smoker's tendency to develop a tolerance to nicotine that requires increasingly higher levels of nicotine to be used over time to achieve the same benefits. As time goes by, even more nicotine is required to maintain this level of satisfaction. The body, and the nervous system in particular, adjusts to constantly receiving this expected level of nicotine and will typically exhibit symptoms of withdrawal without it. Generally speaking, the "heaviness" of ones smoking will have the most impact on the severity of the withdrawal once they quit. Heavy smokers are more likely to experience pronounced withdrawal symptoms than light smokers. The more nicotine you have learned to tolerate in your blood, then the more likely you are to miss it when you stop. This is why a smoker can still experience a mild form of nicotine withdrawal if they cut down on the amount of cigarettes they smoke rather than quitting completely because the body is responding to the reduced amount of nicotine it is receiving. The nicotine in cigarettes produces pleasurable feelings while at the same time acting as a depressant by interfering with the flow of information between the nerve cells. 
Nicotine withdrawal entails both a physiological and psychological dimension. The physiological effects are actually the result of your body returning to normal and attempting to purge itself of the harmful chemicals left behind by smoking. The symptoms of this adjustment may be stressful but they do signify an improvement in your health. The other aspects of the withdrawal dynamic are psychological. The smoker is faced with giving up a habit that has become a compulsive part of their behaviour. Sometimes it is the withdrawal symptoms related to mood and emotion that are the most difficult to overcome. They may also be difficult to differentiate from the other stresses of life. Withdrawal as an emotional reaction has been compared to a period of mourning or grieving where your body misses a stimulus, in this case nicotine, that was considered highly important but was abruptly taken away.
Normally, nicotine, which is its metabolite, remain present in the system of a regular smoker for about three to four days. Diet can help remove the remaining nicotine from your system. For example, drinking lots of water and fruit juices will help rehydrate the body and flush the residue nicotine for the system. Nicotine is a water-soluble drug and will be rapidly excreted from the body once it is no longer introduced into your system. Nicotine will begin to leave your system within two hours of you stopping smoking.The symptoms of nicotine withdraw are usually most pronounced within 48 hours of stopping smoking. It is during this time, when nicotine leaves the body, that these symptoms will be at their most unpleasant. Some people experience nicotine withdrawal symptoms to a point where they find it difficult to function normally during this period. The worst of the withdrawal symptoms are, however, only temporary and you should feel better if you can get through these first few tough days of nicotine withdrawal. These symptoms would usually begin to lessen in three to four days before gradually abating after a few weeks or months. The first two weeks after someone ceases smoking are the often considered the most critical to their success. How long the symptoms of nicotine withdrawal persist depends on the individual and how much they used to smoke because this is what conditioned their body to expect the level of nicotine that is now absent from their system. For most people, any these unpleasant symptoms will no longer be apparent after six months. In extreme circumstances, however, people may find that these symptoms can come and go for years after they stop smoking. The symptoms of nicotine withdrawal can include any or all of the following:

Headache 
Headaches may be caused by increased tension due to the stress of giving up. It can also be due to the body now receiving more oxygen and less carbon monoxide, with an increased blood flow to the back of the brain. Taking a warm shower or bath can help relieve muscle tension, as can doing anything that helps you relax. Some degree of physical activity may provide an outlet for built up tension. The typical duration for this symptom is 1 to 2 weeks.

Nausea, Dizziness 
Feelings of nausea may be connected to dizziness that is actually the result of your bloodstream adjusting to carrying more oxygen and less carbon monoxide. The drop in blood pressure once you stop smoking can also result in dizziness. Try to take it easy and not over exert yourself while experiencing these symptoms. The typical duration for this symptom is 1 to 2 days.

Nicotine Cravings 
Some smokers quit and never feel compelled to smoke again, while others feel they need constant vigilance to prevent resuming their smoking habit years after they quit. Usually tobacco cravings will often begin within the first 6 to 12 hours after you quit smoking. Those people who have to fight the strong urge to smoke again are comparable to the alcoholic who lives from day-to-day fighting their addiction. In these instances, cravings can continue for a while after you stop smoking. Otherwise, individual cravings may only last a matter of seconds before the urge passes. If you smoked at a particular time each day or in certain social situations then you are more likely to have cravings exacerbated by these factors.

Depression 
Nicotine has antidepressant qualities, although smokers may not realise it, and when you stop smoking, depression can be a symptom of nicotine withdrawal. This is why some types of antidepressants are used to treat nicotine dependence. People who have a pre-existing history of depression are more likely to have difficulty in quitting. Nicotine can actually act as both a stimulant and a depressant depending on your mood and the level of nicotine intake. Try to remain positive through the tough times and keep your self-esteem up. Keep in mind how much better off you will be in the long-run for having quit smoking.

Weight Gain, Increased Appetite 
Weight gain can occur once an individual's metabolism returns to normal. Smoking actually increases the amount of calories that your system burns. Smoking also works as an appetite suppressant so once you quit, it is normal for your appetite to increase. Each time nicotine was taken into the body, it caused your body to release stored sugars into the bloodstream. This process may have helped you stave off the natural signals of hunger and suppress appetite. What is more, this process occurs a lot quicker because of smoking than it does naturally by eating, hence the tendency to eat more over a period of time to achieve the same effect. Otherwise it can take as long as twenty minutes to break food down into energy. Mild hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can contribute to symptoms of nicotine withdrawal, including an increased sweet tooth. Drinking fruit juices will help stabilise your blood sugar levels. Some people find that eating replaces the hand to mouth action of smoking and fulfils the desire to do something with their hands. Others find that they eat more because, after about two days from having quit smoking, they can actually taste food again as their sense of smell and taste return. It is also possible that the craving for cigarettes may be mistaken for hunger pangs. The important thing to remember that this weight gain is usually marginal and need only be temporary. A low-calorie and low-fat diet will help will help you remove it. It is actually the result of your body returning to normal so remember to look at the "big picture". It is less of a health risk to gain a little weight than it is to keep smoking. You can exercise and work off any excess weight but the same cannot be said about a cancerous lung.

Irritability, Frustration 
This is quite a common symptom of nicotine withdrawal and almost everybody gets a little cranky when they stop smoking. This is usually an offshoot of your craving for nicotine and an inability to stop thinking about smoking. The best thing to do is to find something else to preoccupy your mind, especially activities that you enjoy. This could be work related, exercise, or a hobby and, if possible, should be an activity that gets you away from situations where you used to smoke. Do not undertake anything too strenuous in the first few days. Get plenty of rest and give your body a chance to adjust. Make an effort to drink less coffee and drinks containing caffeine. If you are used to drinking large amounts of caffeine be aware that stopping may entail some withdrawal symptoms of its own. The typical duration for this symptom is 2 to 4 weeks.

Constipation, Flatulence or Diarrhoea 
As a stimulant, nicotine can increase intestinal movement and suddenly removing nicotine can temporary slow the system as it returns to a normal state. Flatulence may also become a problem. Drinking plenty of liquids, eating a diet that contains roughage and getting plenty of exercise will help. The typical duration for this symptom is 1 to 2 weeks.

Anxiety, Tension 
Anxiety is another common symptom of nicotine withdrawal. Nervousness is actually an indicator of the nervous system returning to normal. When you stop supplying your body with nicotine, you are putting your system under stress. Anxiety is a common trigger for when people would smoke and this only worsens the cycle of anxiety and depression because they invariable focus on the one thing that they cannot have - a cigarette. You need to recognise this and take time out to relax at various times during the day. Periodically taking deep breaths can also be useful if you feel a rising tide of anxiety is about to wash over you. Any activity that releases the build up tension will help you overcome this.

Coughing, Shortness of Breath 
This is less of a symptom of nicotine withdrawal and is more an indicator of the lungs returning to normal and it may be associated with a tightness of the chest. Repeated coughing can cause the chest muscles to become sore. Lung function will increase over time and the body will attempt to loosen the debris of smoking. As your heart and lungs improve, you should be able to notice an increase in your energy levels over time. Drinking plenty of fluids, deep breathing, getting plenty of rest and exercise will assist the restorative process. The typical duration for this symptom is 1 week.

Dry mouth, sore throat 
This is another symptom that has more to do with the body's attempt to recover from years of smoking. Your body is ridding itself of the mucus that clogged airways and restricted breathing. Both a dry mouth and a sore throat can be brought on by the stress of stopping smoking. Drinking plenty of water or fruit juice will help to relieve these and, in the case of a sore throat, throat lozenges will help. The typical duration for this symptom is 1 week.

Fatigue, Drowsiness or Insomnia 
Your body needs to adjust to no longer receiving the stimulant nicotine. Without it, your body's metabolism returns to normal, including a decreased heart rate that may cause feelings of fatigue. Try to combat fatigue by taking frequent, quick power naps. Also, because nicotine affects brain wave function, it can disrupt sleep patterns. Some people even find themselves dreaming about smoking. If you are having trouble sleeping, which is often related to feeling of anxiety, try taking a shower or bath to relax you before going to bed. Do not drink coffee, tea or any other caffeine drink before you go to bed as this may keep you awake. The typical duration for this symptom is 2 to 4 weeks. 

Difficulty Concentrating 
Some people find it difficult to concentrate after quitting smoking. Nicotine is a stimulant that increases alertness, which was one of the reasons why the use of cigarettes was popular amongst soldiers. Difficulty concentrating is also related to other withdrawal symptoms, including anxiety, depression, irritability, and fatigue, each of which does little to aid ones attentiveness. As the body recovers, quitting may appear to have slowed the activity of certain brain chemicals but this is actually a result of the brain no longer being artificially stimulated by nicotine. Efforts to relax may help one to refocus when they find their concentration waning. The typical duration for this symptom is 2 to 4 weeks.

Many of the symptoms listed above mention a typical duration but keep in mind that these can be highly variable. There are many statistics available that estimate how many people will experience a particular withdrawal symptom and how long it will last. They maintain, for example that about half of all people who quit smoking will experience symptoms of irritability that last less than four weeks, while 60% of people who stop smoking will experience symptoms of depression for less than a month. 
Unfortunately, these statistics are not particularly helpful in indicating which symptoms a specific individual will actually experience once he or she quits smoking. Some people may only suffer from a few of these symptoms while others will encounter the full spectrum of symptoms. It has been estimated that about 90% of all young people who use tobacco daily and stop will experience at least one symptom of nicotine withdrawal. The only way to truly find out how much you will be affected is to stop smoking.

Reactions:

22 comments:

  1. I'm happy you're quitting! Good job! :)

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  2. everybody who had been in your "fight" says the same but all claim that the result are all satisfying. good luck!

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  3. after reading this, parang di ko tuloy kaya mag quit. hehe

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  4. wow! this is such a good decision to make...quitting smoking is really commendable...i always tell my father to quit smoking and i hope to does it soon...

    this post is really thought-provoking!

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  5. wow, what a long account on smoking and quitting smoking.. informative anyway, and i will come back to read them when i have the time, haha!!

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  6. a great decision that you've decided to quit smoking.. and it's the 7th day already!! wow, bravo and keep it up!! :)

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  7. i don't smoke and don't think i will smoke either (at least for now, we never know what's gonna happen in the future right?? hahaha).. to me smoking is like spending money to kill your health.. :p

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  8. Good luck! I've never smoked so I wouldn't know, but it sounds really tough from what you say :o

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  9. I'm trying to quit coffee. I used to drink 3 or more cups a day. I know, walang binatbat ang withdrawal symptoms ko sa pag-quit ng yosi.

    I only experience headaches, restlessness, and inability to concentrate.

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  10. Way to go, Lawrence!

    It takes a lot of will power to quit smoking.

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  11. From the detailed entry here, I sort of understand why my hubby is so reluctant to ditch this habit.

    But when there's a will there's a way, right? My father who is a chain smoker since he was a teenager, stopped completely last year. I love him!

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  12. I was a brat who smoked even before high school and have successfully quit for over 10 years now. I was a party animal then, who went clubbing 5 times weekly and smoked so much with alcohol drinks. I also drank lots of coffee almost daily. I quit after reading some religious articles about nicotine blocking our body's meridian which will affect one's soul from emerging upon death.
    I was worried about the side effects about quitting and prepared myself mentally to stop. I continued to drink coffee like normal and that helped to prevent any cravings. I never lit up any stick ever since. You can do it too!!!!.

    Mabuhay Lawrence!

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  13. Best of luck! I think this post is awesome because you provide so many helpful facts about quitting and what the body goes through. I learned a lot and commend you for your efforts!

    ~Jess
    http://thesecretdmsfilesoffairdaymorrow.blogspot.com/

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  14. Quitting smoking can be very challenging. But it can also be fulfilling especially for those who can succeed. And thanks to the alternatives like electronic cigs, smokers are more confident to manage the said vice.

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  15. dcky don-this is my 11th day with out smoking im feeling good but feeling dying heheheheheh

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  16. 7th say today of not smoking and starting to feel irratable and just starting to get a cold as well just hope I can keep it up

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  17. 7th say today of not smoking and starting to feel irratable and just starting to get a cold as well just hope I can keep it up

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  18. But smoking natural pure tobacco is something all together different and can be very good for you health wise in different situations. Air Purifier for Smoke

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  19. Smoking cigarettes is really an expensive habit. The average price per pack of cigarettes, for example, is just about one dollar; people who smoke two packs of cigarettes a day therefore spend $2 per day on their habit. At the end of one year these smokers incur a huge debt, why not try SMOK TFV4 Sub Ohm Tank Atomizer it's much cheap than others and also full fill your nicotine carving..

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